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COUNTING AND WEIGHING SCALES AND CONTROLS FOR INDUSTRY

-- 100+ Years of Sustained Accuracy --

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100 Years of SUSTAINED ACCURACY Made in the USA
 
 
We celebrated our 100th Year in 2008... and are pleased to provide some historical photo scans that show the evolution of the weighing industry and our company specifically. 
Enjoy this slice of Americana:
 
 Early photo of our jubilant and enthusiastic crew at the original plant, which still stands, on Lancaster Avenue in Lancaster, PA.  Established in 1908, the company grew quickly with a line of gas pumps, oil metering devices, and the technology breakthrough of the time, a ribbon-and-cam indicating mechanism for bench scales that didn't use springs-- therefore provided Sustained Accuracy. 
 
 
 
 
L:  The patent that changed everything for the fledgeling company.  R:  Don't worry-- we prevailed-- Business was messy during the early days!
 
 
    
Early products included a line of gas pumps and oil metering devices, in addition to the revolutionary idea of a scale without springs; shown above an early patent. 
 
 
Early 'fan dial' scales-- first use of the ribbon-and-cam counterweight method of indication-- which overcame the problems with springs (temperature, stretching) providing superior accuracy and performance.  Many designs features attractive castings and embellished covers.  Many were ordered by candy manufacturers, given away as premiums for retailists meeting sales quotas and were private labelled-- such as the Walla Walla Gum Company and Wrigley for a few.
Intricate detail - note unique glass cover showing counterweight and bottom of ribbon connecting to stirrup which made springs obsolete!
 
   
L:  Shareholder records.  R:  Early letterhead, showing how the products were presented; at this time the plant was on Lancaster Avenue, Lancaster, PA. 
Note the dramatic image of the 'plant' choking smoke-- which used a little bit of 'artists' license!           
 
 
 
Built along a rail siding in 1911, the 'new' facility allowed for major growth and expansion into a wider range of scales - rear of facilith shown in this view.  The company grew in leaps and bounds!  The 21 Graybill Road, Bareville (now Leola) plant which still stands today, was expanded, remodeled, and modified many times over the years.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Front view during 1911 construction shows the New Holland spur railroad siding and water tower and original loading dock. 
 
Early crew, circa 1912 posed at break time.  It was not unusual for two or three generations of family members to work for the company, known locally as the 'scales factory' or 'Bareville Scale Works' - all marked under the Pennsylvania Scale brand and original ownership, the National Store Specialty Company.  Pretty soon, Pennsylvania Scale became the sole brand and Corporate identity. 
 
Aerial view from the '60s.  The white block section was an addition, one of many over the years.  Allen Johnson invested in the company in the '40s, bringing his idea for mechanical ratio counting scales.  That product line (counting scales) and Pitney Bowes mail and parcel scales resulted in explosive growth during this period-- at our peak we had 140+ employees in 2 shifts. 
 
Stock sold to capitalize the construction of the new building. 
 
L:  Barn find, gasoline pump.  Note light fixture on top which would be the location for colorful glass globes (which are now highly collectible).  R:  The I-10 dial scale could be ordered in many configurations and became a great choice for quality checking, industrial labs, ingredient weighing, and ultimately a full line of postal and parcel weighing scales.
 
Early application of a mercury switch, used to control the fill of material-- early customer:  Stoner Inc. (manufacturer of cleaning materials in Quarryville PA)
 
Turbine blade classifying system showing sample blades and adaptors for JET ENGINES by 'Moment Weight'-- when the turbines were assembled, the engine would be statically balanced for high RPM applications.  This was high tech work at the time (early '50s).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
  
The introduction of the C-140 Counting Scale followed by the C-200 revolutionized the industry!  Hundreds of thousands were produced and many are still in regular use.  The development of the RENTAL SCALE business as an outgrowth of early IBM accounting methods created a new market.  Most have been melted down for scrap, replaced by electronic scales.
 
  
The advent of check weighing scales for package checking, quality control, and portion control expanded the market. 
 
  
 
Many icons of the weighing business!  Recognize anyone?  These were heady days and Pennsylvania Scale was a busy place.  R center, trenchcoat and glasses, Alley Y. Johnson, also one of our biggest distributors at the time, steered the company to a bright future.
 
 
  
 
  
 
     
 
   
 
  
 
        
 
       
 
   
 
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
 
   
 
   
 
           
 
   
 
   
 
     
 
 
      
 
 
 
      
 
   
 
 
 
 
Some things never change.  We still provide rugged accurate equipment designed to LAST (with a 15-20 year minimum
service life) that is easy to calibrate, with long Warranties, excellent and flexible Customer Service, and dealer-friendly.  Deep in the soul of Pennsylvania Scale products is a pride of workmanship and a commitment that is unbeatable... and unlike our competitors who are sourcing products from around the world, we build and calibrate EVERY Pennsylvania Scale product ourselves in either Lancaster, PA or Terre Haute, IN...
 
HERE'S TO ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL AND PROFITABLE HUNDREDYEARS
2008 - 2108!